Thursday, June 30, 2005

Myristicaceae


Myristicaceae
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
I am sure these are from the nutmeg family, perhaps a Horsfieldia species. The smell of the rind is characteristic of the nutmeg. MacRitchie, June 2005.

Lyssa zampa spotted at Sengkang HDB estate


Lyssa zampa
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
I have been following Otterman's Lyssa zampa reports with gusto. So as we came back from the pasar malam, there it was infront of the lift, on the seldomed noticed notice board. It was photographed several times and I am glad to add to the sightings. This is fresh report. Anchorvale Road, 10 pm, 30 June 2005. The back of the moth is hairy; overall, this moth is quite an eye catcher.

Dipterocarpus grandiflorus


Dipterocarpus grandiflorus
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Here are the pretty looking flowers of the keruing (taken in Mar 2005) featured in Francis and the Dipteropcarp. They spot the brown leaf litter pleasantly with pink and white petals. Celebrate masting, it happens once in a few years.

Blend in like bugman


Bug on Simpoh ayer
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
If it hadn't been for my sharp eyes, I would have missed this bug on the abaxial surface of the simpoh ayer leaf. It blended in well with its vein-like margins and central axis. What creature is this?

Dipterocarpus grandiflorus


Dipterocarpus grandiflorus
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Here are the pretty looking flowers of the keruing (taken in Mar 2005) featured in Francis and the Dipteropcarp. They spot the brown leaf litter pleasantly with pink and white petals. Celebrate masting, it happens once in a few years.

Blend in like bugman


Bug on Simpoh ayer
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
If it hadn't been for my sharp eyes, I would have missed this bug on the abaxial surface of the simpoh ayer leaf. It blended in well with its vein-like margins and central axis. What creature is this?

Caterpillars in June


caterpillars
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
After reading Otterman's "Does Lyssa zampa eat?", I wondered if the three different types of caterpillars I saw one afternoon at MacRitchie in June, acting gregarious, were also doing a Lyssa zampa. Note the fig tree on the right stripped of its leaves by munching caterpillars on each branch. The forest has been busy, unbeknownst to many...

Note: I originally posted the sightings in Mar but realised that it was actually in early June that I saw them in MacRitchie.

Rengas


Gluta wallichii
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Gluta wallichii, Anacardiaceae. Cousin of the mangoes, the sap of this plant, which charactersitically turns black when exposed to air, is said irritate some to the point of developing painful blisters. Looks like I am not one of them.

Bend it like the simpoh ayer


Dillenia suffructicosa
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Dillenia suffructicosa, Dilleniaceae. The flowers hang down but the fruits face up thanks to some torsion by the stalk. Also known affectionately as the CB leaf.

Mengkuang Laut


Pandanus odoratissimus
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Pandanus odoratissimus, Pandanaceae, Monocot. The fruiting head is as big as a man's head. A magnificent pandan (yes, its a close cousin of our pandan wangi, Pandanus amaryllifolius), that punctuates a pristine beach forest, along with the Ximenes.

Licuala peltata var. sumawongii


Licuala peltata var. sumawongii
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
The beautiful 1st order inflorescence branches of this palas against the backdrop of its peltate (shield-shaped) fronds.

Kid stands in front of Licuala peltata var. sumawongii


Licuala peltata
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
This palas was in flower (mature) when I was there 2 weeks ago. I wonder if it is also part of the mast flowering that happened a couple of months ago in Feb.

Piaget's moon


Piaget's moon
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
A revision of a previous blog Piaget and the Moon, now complete with picture.
Thanks to Piaget, I got to play a real neat game with Joshua. In “Giant in the Nursery” (Elkind 19772), Piaget describes how children perceive inanimate objects to have their own identity, so in explaining how a moon seems be overhead all the time, he said that one should just explain that the moon was following the child, anyone who explains otherwise, misses the point. So now, Josh thinks he’s special to Brother Moon and that its following him around. He got to play peek-a-boo with the moon under the canopy of a tree one clear moonlit night.


Elkind, D. (1972). Giant in the Nursery – Jean Piaget. In: RF Biehler (Ed), Psychology Applied to Teaching, Selected Readings. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, USA. Pp 147––169.

Matt tunggu kretapi


Matt_kretapi
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Matt is waiting for the train... where is the train papa? Where is mummy? I want mummy...

Josh duduk kretapi


Josh_kretapi
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
This is Josh's signature goofy smile. We decided to take the kretapi KTM to Johor and do a spot of shopping. He loves Thomas the Tank Engine right now.

Otterman


Otterman
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Siva looking relaxed last Saturday on Pedal Ubin.

Caterpillars in June


caterpillars
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
After reading Otterman's "Does Lyssa zampa eat?", I wondered if the three different types of caterpillars I saw one afternoon at MacRitchie in June, acting gregarious, were also doing a Lyssa zampa. Note the fig tree on the right stripped of its leaves by munching caterpillars on each branch. The forest has been busy, unbeknownst to many...


Note: I originally posted the sightings in Mar but realised that it was actually in early June that I saw them in MacRitchie.

Rengas


Gluta wallichii
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Gluta wallichii, Anacardiaceae. Cousin of the mangoes, the sap of this plant, which charactersitically turns black when exposed to air, is said irritate some to the point of developing painful blisters. Looks like I am not one of them.

Bend it like the simpoh ayer


Dillenia suffructicosa
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Dillenia suffructicosa, Dilleniaceae. The flowers hang down but the fruits face up thanks to some torsion by the stalk. Also known affectionately as the CB leaf.

Mengkuang Laut


Pandanus odoratissimus
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Pandanus odoratissimus, Pandanaceae, Monocot. The fruiting head is as big as a man's head. A magnificent pandan (yes, its a close cousin of our pandan wangi, Pandanus amaryllifolius), that punctuates a pristine beach forest, along with the Ximenes.

Licuala peltata var. sumawongii


Licuala peltata var. sumawongii
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
The beautiful 1st order inflorescence branches of this palas against the backdrop of its peltate (shield-shaped) fronds.

Kid stands in front of Licuala peltata var. sumawongii


Licuala peltata
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
This palas was in flower (mature) when I was there 2 weeks ago. I wonder if it is also part of the mast flowering that happened a couple of months ago in Feb.

Piaget's moon


Piaget's moon
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
A revision of a previous blog Piaget and the Moon, now complete with picture.
Thanks to Piaget, I got to play a real neat game with Joshua. In “Giant in the Nursery” (Elkind 19772), Piaget describes how children perceive inanimate objects to have their own identity, so in explaining how a moon seems be overhead all the time, he said that one should just explain that the moon was following the child, anyone who explains otherwise, misses the point. So now, Josh thinks he’s special to Brother Moon and that its following him around. He got to play peek-a-boo with the moon under the canopy of a tree one clear moonlit night.


Elkind, D. (1972). Giant in the Nursery – Jean Piaget. In: RF Biehler (Ed), Psychology Applied to Teaching, Selected Readings. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, USA. Pp 147––169.

Wednesday, June 29, 2005

Matt tunggu kretapi


Matt_kretapi
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Matt is waiting for the train... where is the train papa? Where is mummy? I want mummy...

Josh duduk kretapi


Josh_kretapi
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
This is Josh's signature goofy smile. We decided to take the kretapi KTM to Johor and do a spot of shopping. He loves Thomas the Tank Engine right now.

Otterman


Otterman
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Siva looking relaxed last Saturday on Pedal Ubin.

Rambai


Baccaurea motleyana
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Baccaurea motleyana, Euphorbiaceae. The rambai certainly epitomises the kampung feel of Pulau ubin. It is related to the duku langsat and tastes like it, except that it is sourish. My mum used to buy this from the market but now there are only apples and pears with the occasional regional fruits like the mangosteen or durian. Conserve our fruit heritage.

Tuesday, June 28, 2005

Rambai


Baccaurea motleyana
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Baccaurea motleyana, Euphorbiaceae. The rambai certainly epitomises the kampung feel of Pulau ubin. It is related to the duku langsat and tastes like it, except that it is sourish. My mum used to buy this from the market but now there are only apples and pears with the occasional regional fruits like the mangosteen or durian. Conserve our fruit heritage.

Xylocarpus granatum


Xylocarpus granatum
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Thanks to rusty botanical knowledge, I couldn't tell which Xylocarpus species this was. Thankfully, someone in the group had the "Guide to the mangroves of Singapore I".
me:" eh, which xylocarpus is this; I know got two."
hk:" according to the guidebook Xylocarpus granatum has yellowish or greenish, smooth and flaking bark (vs. dark grey, non-flaking fissured bark in X. moluccensis)."
me: "okay, easy peasy."

Being a botanist


mangrove
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
The picture says it all. As I turned back to see how my companions were doing, all my botanical instincts went on high alert and I felt myself leap out of my skin. The mozzies were a welcome menace and the mud was spa-treatment. Yes, I have been deprived. I am an unabashed botanist.

Ximenia americana


Ximenia americana
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
A stand of Ximenes along Semakau. Ladybug mentioned that she remembered eating the sourish fruit, an orange olive-shaped drupe, as a child. She recognised it instantly when she chanced a fruiting individual. The hedge of the beach forest dominated by this species was nostalgic of island surveys I helped carry out several years back. In the hot sun and albedo, the juicy and sourish drupes were refreshing. This was pure and unadulterated beach forest.

The delight of seeing things in their natural habitat


Cerbera odallum
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Cerbera odallum Apocynaceae. This picture of the Pong Pong tree was taken along the coast of Semakau. Along the long stretch of beach forest, there'd be several individuals and their white flowers are just so beautiful to behold. Somehow, they don't look so good planted along the wayside.

Talipariti tiliaceum


Talipariti tiliaceum
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Inspired by Otterman's recent artful entries on the sea hibiscus "Blooming Sea Hibiscus" and "Flowers of the Sea hibiscus", I couldn't resist taking this picture at Semakau. It really is photogenic.

Xylocarpus granatum


Xylocarpus granatum
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Thanks to rusty botanical knowledge, I couldn't tell which Xylocarpus species this was. Thankfully, someone in the group had the "Guide to the mangroves of Singapore I".
me:" eh, which xylocarpus is this; I know got two."
hk:" according to the guidebook Xylocarpus granatum has yellowish or greenish, smooth and flaking bark (vs. dark grey, non-flaking fissured bark in X. moluccensis)."
me: "okay, easy peasy."

Being a botanist


mangrove
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
The picture says it all. As I turned back to see how my companions were doing, all my botanical instincts went on high alert and I felt myself leap out of my skin. The mozzies were a welcome menace and the mud was spa-treatment. Yes, I have been deprived. I am an unabashed botanist.

Ximenia americana


Ximenia americana
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
A stand of Ximenes along Semakau. Ladybug mentioned that she remembered eating the sourish fruit, an orange olive-shaped drupe, as a child. She recognised it instantly when she chanced a fruiting individual. The hedge of the beach forest dominated by this species was nostalgic of island surveys I helped carry out several years back. In the hot sun and albedo, the juicy and sourish drupes were refreshing. This was pure and unadulterated beach forest.

Monday, June 27, 2005

The delight of seeing things in their natural habitat


Cerbera odallum
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Cerbera odallum Apocynaceae. This picture of the Pong Pong tree was taken along the coast of Semakau. Along the long stretch of beach forest, there'd be several individuals and their white flowers are just so beautiful to behold. Somehow, they don't look so good planted along the wayside.

Talipariti tiliaceum


Talipariti tiliaceum
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Inspired by Otterman's recent artful entries on the sea hibiscus "Blooming Sea Hibiscus" and "Flowers of the Sea hibiscus", I couldn't resist taking this picture at Semakau. It really is photogenic.

Saturday, June 25, 2005

Ketok your head


Parkia speciosa
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Parkia speciosa. Form the Mimosoideae; Leguminosae. speciosa in latin means showy or beautiful. My father said that "in the old kampung days" the inflorescence which looks like a bulb set on a long stalk was used to play a game called ketok ketok and they would use that to hit each other on the head.

The beans are the famous petai which is another favorite delicacy when fried with sambal.

Picutre taken today with my free BenQ camera that came with the SCV (which has been terminated because of too much moving images, music videos and travel and adventure). The pictures are disappointing but I just need an image to blog on. This I blame Otterman. Why all this call-signs? like Maverick and Goose.

Nephelium malaiense


Nephelium malaiense
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Mata kuching. This is related to the longan, lychee and rambutan.

Along Island Club Road to the TreeTop Walk are some old kampungs. This is the first time I have seen it in fruit, honestly, its the first time I have seen this tree (its a lifer). The flesh of the fruit (picked up from the road and tasted much to the disgust of Jen) is really thin but the taste is heavenly and alluring. Sexy. So if you are vegan, have some of this "eye of the cat" instead of oysters and soon it will get you purring...

Corner (1988) described the mata kuching to be one of the handsomest trees in Malaya when grown to perfection.

Ketok your head


Parkia speciosa
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Parkia speciosa. Form the Mimosoideae; Leguminosae. speciosa in latin means showy or beautiful. My father said that "in the old kampung days" the inflorescence which looks like a bulb set on a long stalk was used to play a game called ketok ketok and they would use that to hit each other on the head.

The beans are the famous petai which is another favorite delicacy when fried with sambal.

Picutre taken today with my free BenQ camera that came with the SCV (which has been terminated because of too much moving images, music videos and travel and adventure). The pictures are disappointing but I just need an image to blog on. This I blame Otterman. Why all this call-signs? like Maverick and Goose.

Nephelium malaiense


Nephelium malaiense
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Mata kuching. This is related to the longan, lychee and rambutan.

Along Island Club Road to the TreeTop Walk are some old kampungs. This is the first time I have seen it in fruit, honestly, its the first time I have seen this tree (its a lifer). The flesh of the fruit (picked up from the road and tasted much to the disgust of Jen) is really thin but the taste is heavenly and alluring. Sexy. So if you are vegan, have some of this "eye of the cat" instead of oysters and soon it will get you purring...

Corner (1988) described the mata kuching to be one of the handsomest trees in Malaya when grown to perfection.

Wednesday, June 22, 2005

Oak trees in MacRitchie


Lithocarpus sp.
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
These are the acorns of a Lithocarpus sp. MacRitchie, 11 Mar 2005. "That Oak-trees (Quercus, Lithocarpus) occur in Malaya often comes as a surprise because our ideas on the nature and distribution of plants are sadly distorted through ignorance of tropical botany", Corner (1998) in Wayside trees of Malaya.

Ref:
Corner, E.J.H. (1988). Wayside Trees of Malaya.Vol 1. The Malayan Nature Society, KL, Malaysia

Malayan Chestnut


Castanopsis inermis
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Castanopsis inermis Fagaceae (Oak Family). The local name for chestnuts is Berangan. BTNR, 20 Jun 2005.

Seraya


Shorea ?curtisii
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
This is probably Shorea curtisii, Dipterocarpaceae, as it has three wings and the size of the mature fruit (centre) seems right. It fruits every 5-10 years after severe drought. The last masting event for Singapore was thought to be 6 years ago. The fruits littered the forest floor. BTNR, 20 June 2005.

Cat's claws


Caesalpinia sumatrana
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Caesalpinia sumatrana, Caesalpinioideae/Leguminosae. 20 Jun 2005, BTNR. A climber with prickles set on top of woody knobs along its length.

Hopea odorata in the Botanic Gardens


Hopea odorata
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
15 June 2005. Singapore Botanic Gardens. The Chengal pasir trees in the Gardens in the evening. The fruits are shown one blog away.

"Thottea" see you there


Thottea grandiflora
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Thottea grandiflora Aristolochiaceae. MacRtichie, 11 June 2005.

A nature watch article by Goh Si Guim (1999) mentions it as "caterpillar foodplant for two locally rare butterflies."

Ref:
Goh SG (1999) Naturewatch. Vol 7 No 3 Sep-Dec 1999. URL: http://habitatnews.nus.edu.sg/pub/naturewatch/text/a073d.htm

Hopea odorata in the Botanic Gardens

The chengal pasir fruits in Botanic Gardens, 15 Jun 2005.

Bat-lily begins... and ends


Tacca intergrifolia
Originally uploaded by lekowala.
Tacca intergrifolia inflorescence in Macritchie (18 Mar 2005) and fruits in BTNR (20 June 2005). Almost all the individuals encountered in BTNR had fruits.